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Tightwad

Cam Chain Tensioner, Without Throttle Body Removal

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Ok, I am not a writer. I don't have the witty banter abilities of great technical writers who pull you into their project no matter the subject. Instead I am a typical desk jockey who rides VFR and fixes stuff if he can. Before I get into the "easy" way to change the CCT, let me point out that I did not come up with the process on my own. I borrowed bits and pieces from lots of people. The best replacement guide can be found here, CCT change by Rad, where it is done "by the book". In the resulting discussion it was revealed that removing the Throttle Bodies and so forth was a waste of time, as the CCT can be removed without it.

As a second note, I did not change the rear CCT, and I don't imagine I know or could discover any easier way...it seems simple enough already. See the link above to find how to change that CCT if needed.

As a third note (I like notes), I don't believe the CCTs EVER go bad...I think they make noise when the spring loses a bit of tension...more to come on that later (see how I "hook" you...just like the creative writing class said!)

So on to CCT removal and replacement (this order works best I have found)...Anyway, I didn't have music playing, I don't drink beer, and I barely remembered to take pictures....so bear with me. Finding the CCT was the first chore. It is located on the right side, kinda behind and back of the R/R. To find it you need to remove:

Right Fairing

  • 8 allen screws
  • 1 blind rivet
  • Slider (if applicable)

Seat

  • Just use the key, and remove

Tank

  • two 8mm head bolts, use 1/4" driver
  • Restraint Cable
  • Two 10mm head bolts at back of tank

Air Box Top

  • Hose from top
  • screws around perimeter

Air Box Bottom

  • Velocity Stacks, Phillips Head Bolts
  • Sensor connector on bottom
  • Vacuum line going in front of box
  • Small connections at the back

When moved, the airbox looks like this:

airbox_moved.jpg

Note the airbox was just rotated away from the CCT. Tank was also rotated the same way and laid across the seat rails. You can see the CCT at the very bottom, just right of center.

Now you are almost there....just need to remove those cooling hoses to make it stupidly easy to reach the CCT. Remove the one pointing out first, and connect a short section(2-3 feet) of 1/4" or similar hose (I didn't measure it, just some I had around, but 1/4" should be about right).

drain_tube_2.jpg

Route this into a drain pan or later you get this:

opps__piddled.jpg

next remove the second hose....this is what makes the first connection take a bit of a leak

second_hose_removed.jpg

not much fluid is lost...a bit more than is pictured here:

antifreeze_from_cct_change.jpg

Don't leave this for the dog/cats to drink, unless you don't like them much....

Now it's time to remove that CCT! Simply use your 8mm socket on extension, and take the center bolt out:

removing_the_cap.jpg

This is where the "key" goes in.

insert_lock.jpg

The keys job is to stop the CCT from extending when you remove it from the engine. Keeping it from extending makes it less likely that you knock a bit off into the motor, and also makes it easier for the CCT to clear the various bits above it. If you are really ambitious you could actually rotate the CCT to shorten it and make it even easier...but that would be over kill. After loosing both mounting bolts, and removing them, the CCT just slides right out:

cct_coming_out.jpg

Here is where I have to admit I have a problem. I enjoy seeing how things work. I managed to restrain myself from taking apart my new CCT to see how it works, but the old one was just there....so I had to do it. Initially I planned to try the Reddog idea of tightening the spring....but I screwed up my spring after I removed it, so that was nixxed. Here is a nice picture of my CCT doing it's best Humpty Dumpty impression:

cct_falling_to_pieces.jpg

you can see where the spring is messed up....yours won't look like that (don't take it apart to see tho). Let me describe the parts, so hopefully this makes more sense to those who want to know. Those who don't want to know can skip to anther thread or something...

Clockwise starting from the left you have:

  • CCT Gasket
  • CCT body, with circlip just slid back
  • key
  • Sping(in the middle)
  • bushing/sleeve
  • Worm Drive
  • Shaft with puck on end

The sleeve/bushing goes around the worm drive, and over the shaft below the locking tab. The locking tab doesn't come off the shaft (without removing far too much).

The way the CCT works is this:

The spring is coiled around the shaft, with one end going into the slot at the bottom of the worm drive, and the other end into a slit at the top of the CCT body. As the worm drive is rotated clockwise, the spring winds up....and if allowed the worm drive will rotate counter clockwise to release tension. The worm drive can only rotate 4 times before the Shaft reaches its stopper. I believe the reason you begin to hear CCT noise is that the spring is able to unwind with a bit of Cam Chain stretch, and thus the spring is not as tight as it was originally. This loosness allows a bit more play that normal, and oscillations begin. Whether different oils help or not I don't even want to discuss.

If you wish to attempt to modify your CCT to save some cash, here is how you do it:

Holding the CCT in such a way that your finger restrains the shaft from advancing, remove the "key". Using a small (probably modified for the purpose) screwdriver, rotate the wormdrive from the access hole clockwise until it stops. Counts the revolutions. It will stop with the shaft all the way compressed. Now reinsert the key, and while still holding the shaft, slide the circlip down so it no longer restrains the locking tab. slide the locking tab carefully up the shaft out of the grooves, noting 2 grooves are wider than the other 2. Then very carefully rotate the shaft counter-clockwise 1-2 times as many revolutions as it took to compress it initially. (this figure is a guess, your results may very, I make no guarantees..written, expressed or otherwise, not available in all locations, subject to rule changes etc). After rotating the shaft counter-clockwise, slide the locking tab back down, and replace the circlip. Re-insert the screwdriver and rotate the gear clockwise to compress the shaft once more. Now you can reinstall the CCT and see if you saved $100.

Reinstalling the CCT is the reverse of removal (I hate it when manuals state that, but it's true. Just check and make sure all connections are replaced or you may not like the results...I didn't.

look_close.jpg

That is the connector I forgot. The FI light was blinking when I started the bike. I was able to get it back on without removing the air box again using a long thing screwdriver. Speaking of which, here are all the tools I needed to do the job:

every_tool_needed.jpg

1/4" driver handle

1/4" Rachet

1/4" x3" extension

1/4" x 6" extension

1/4"x1/4" socket for hose clamp

1/4"x8mm socket for CCT bolts and tank bolts

Phillips Screw Driver

3/8" Rachet

3/8"x10mm socket

3/8" x 6" extension

Needed this time, but not always required:

Long Needle Nose pliars

Extra Long thin screwdriver

Telescoping Magnetic pickup tool

Some pictures were not included, you can see them all here:

http://www.wiremybike.com/Slideshows/CCT%20Change/

  • Like 2

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Ok, I am not a writer. I don't have the witty banter abilities of great technical writers who pull you into their project no matter the subject. Instead I am a typical desk jockey who rides VFR and fixes stuff if he can. Before I get into the "easy" way to change the CCT, let me point out that I did not come up with the process on my own. I borrowed bits and pieces from lots of people. The best replacement guide can be found here, CCT change by Rad, where it is done "by the book". In the resulting discussion it was revealed that removing the Throttle Bodies and so forth was a waste of time, as the CCT can be removed without it.

As a second note, I did not change the rear CCT, and I don't imagine I know or could discover any easier way...it seems simple enough already. See the link above to find how to change that CCT if needed.

As a third note (I like notes), I don't believe the CCTs EVER go bad...I think they make noise when the spring loses a bit of tension...more to come on that later (see how I "hook" you...just like the creative writing class said!)

So on to CCT removal and replacement (this order works best I have found)...Anyway, I didn't have music playing, I don't drink beer, and I barely remembered to take pictures....so bear with me. Finding the CCT was the first chore. It is located on the right side, kinda behind and back of the R/R. To find it you need to remove:

Right Fairing

  • 8 allen screws
  • 1 blind rivet
  • Slider (if applicable)

Seat

  • Just use the key, and remove

Tank

  • two 8mm head bolts, use 1/4" driver
  • Restraint Cable
  • Two 10mm head bolts at back of tank

Air Box Top

  • Hose from top
  • screws around perimeter

Air Box Bottom

  • Velocity Stacks, Phillips Head Bolts
  • Sensor connector on bottom
  • Vacuum line going in front of box
  • Small connections at the back

When moved, the airbox looks like this:

airbox_moved.jpg

Note the airbox was just rotated away from the CCT. Tank was also rotated the same way and laid across the seat rails. You can see the CCT at the very bottom, just right of center.

Now you are almost there....just need to remove those cooling hoses to make it stupidly easy to reach the CCT. Remove the one pointing out first, and connect a short section(2-3 feet) of 1/4" or similar hose (I didn't measure it, just some I had around, but 1/4" should be about right).

drain_tube_2.jpg

Route this into a drain pan or later you get this:

opps__piddled.jpg

next remove the second hose....this is what makes the first connection take a bit of a leak

second_hose_removed.jpg

not much fluid is lost...a bit more than is pictured here:

antifreeze_from_cct_change.jpg

Don't leave this for the dog/cats to drink, unless you don't like them much....

Now it's time to remove that CCT! Simply use your 8mm socket on extension, and take the center bolt out:

removing_the_cap.jpg

This is where the "key" goes in.

insert_lock.jpg

The keys job is to stop the CCT from extending when you remove it from the engine. Keeping it from extending makes it less likely that you knock a bit off into the motor, and also makes it easier for the CCT to clear the various bits above it. If you are really ambitious you could actually rotate the CCT to shorten it and make it even easier...but that would be over kill. After loosing both mounting bolts, and removing them, the CCT just slides right out:

cct_coming_out.jpg

Here is where I have to admit I have a problem. I enjoy seeing how things work. I managed to restrain myself from taking apart my new CCT to see how it works, but the old one was just there....so I had to do it. Initially I planned to try the Reddog idea of tightening the spring....but I screwed up my spring after I removed it, so that was nixxed. Here is a nice picture of my CCT doing it's best Humpty Dumpty impression:

cct_falling_to_pieces.jpg

you can see where the spring is messed up....yours won't look like that (don't take it apart to see tho). Let me describe the parts, so hopefully this makes more sense to those who want to know. Those who don't want to know can skip to anther thread or something...

Clockwise starting from the left you have:

  • CCT Gasket
  • CCT body, with circlip just slid back
  • key
  • Sping(in the middle)
  • bushing/sleeve
  • Worm Drive
  • Shaft with puck on end

The sleeve/bushing goes around the worm drive, and over the shaft below the locking tab. The locking tab doesn't come off the shaft (without removing far too much).

The way the CCT works is this:

The spring is coiled around the shaft, with one end going into the slot at the bottom of the worm drive, and the other end into a slit at the top of the CCT body. As the worm drive is rotated clockwise, the spring winds up....and if allowed the worm drive will rotate counter clockwise to release tension. The worm drive can only rotate 4 times before the Shaft reaches its stopper. I believe the reason you begin to hear CCT noise is that the spring is able to unwind with a bit of Cam Chain stretch, and thus the spring is not as tight as it was originally. This loosness allows a bit more play that normal, and oscillations begin. Whether different oils help or not I don't even want to discuss.

If you wish to attempt to modify your CCT to save some cash, here is how you do it:

Holding the CCT in such a way that your finger restrains the shaft from advancing, remove the "key". Using a small (probably modified for the purpose) screwdriver, rotate the wormdrive from the access hole clockwise until it stops. Counts the revolutions. It will stop with the shaft all the way compressed. Now reinsert the key, and while still holding the shaft, slide the circlip down so it no longer restrains the locking tab. slide the locking tab carefully up the shaft out of the grooves, noting 2 grooves are wider than the other 2. Then very carefully rotate the shaft counter-clockwise 1-2 times as many revolutions as it took to compress it initially. (this figure is a guess, your results may very, I make no guarantees..written, expressed or otherwise, not available in all locations, subject to rule changes etc). After rotating the shaft counter-clockwise, slide the locking tab back down, and replace the circlip. Re-insert the screwdriver and rotate the gear clockwise to compress the shaft once more. Now you can reinstall the CCT and see if you saved $100.

Reinstalling the CCT is the reverse of removal (I hate it when manuals state that, but it's true. Just check and make sure all connections are replaced or you may not like the results...I didn't.

look_close.jpg

That is the connector I forgot. The FI light was blinking when I started the bike. I was able to get it back on without removing the air box again using a long thing screwdriver. Speaking of which, here are all the tools I needed to do the job:

every_tool_needed.jpg

1/4" driver handle

1/4" Rachet

1/4" x3" extension

1/4" x 6" extension

1/4"x1/4" socket for hose clamp

1/4"x8mm socket for CCT bolts and tank bolts

Phillips Screw Driver

3/8" Rachet

3/8"x10mm socket

3/8" x 6" extension

Needed this time, but not always required:

Long Needle Nose pliars

Extra Long thin screwdriver

Telescoping Magnetic pickup tool

Some pictures were not included, you can see them all here:

http://www.wiremybike.com/Slideshows/CCT%20Change/

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Thanks so very much for putting together this handy guide. I am a procrastinator...I have the new CCT, all tools, and a shop manual but always find something else to do besides taking apart my Honda. Your pics make it simple and are a huge help in motivating me to change this out. I really appreciate the time you spent in doing the write up and taking the great photos. You are a big help to all the VFRD people here. The part # on my CCT is 14520-MCW-013 (I think its an updated one? dunno) , what was your CCT part #?

Again, BIG THANKS !!! for this info ...is very helpful...Doug :biggrin:

(Also looking for an extra CCT KEY if anyone has one they can post me? thanks)

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Great write up......thanks Tightwad. I may be doing this one before the TexasMac meet as mine is getting a bit noisy.

Slammer............think you could save this one in the "how to" section??

This has got to be the best motorcycle website on the planet, and that is because of it's CEO, moderators and members. :biggrin:

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Thanks so very much for putting together this handy guide. I am a procrastinator...I have the new CCT, all tools, and a shop manual but always find something else to do besides taking apart my Honda. Your pics make it simple and are a huge help in motivating me to change this out. I really appreciate the time you spent in doing the write up and taking the great photos. You are a big help to all the VFRD people here. The part # on my CCT is 14520-MCW-013 (I think its an updated one? dunno) , what was your CCT part #?

Again, BIG THANKS !!! for this info ...is very helpful...Doug :biggrin:

(Also looking for an extra CCT KEY if anyone has one they can post me? thanks)

I made an extra "key" out of a small piece of sheetmetal (part of an old CPU power supply actually). I found that when turning the worm drive it would bend this piece...you can see in the picture of the CCT disassembled that it is twisted. I then used the small flatblade screwdriver that I ground the sides down and it worked much better.

I think you have the right CCT part #, I don't have my other in front of me....there is only one choice available now I think.

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Well done TW :biggrin:

I have a feeling that replacing the front CCT on my VFR will be an every 20K-30K mile project; I will try your way next time for the front one.

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What a terrific post, I'm sure the dealers will hate you for showing how easy this job can be done, they will charge the earth for doing the same, this is better than looking in the manual. Thanks for sharing this with us and taking the trouble to do it all.

Safe riding Plasma

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Nicely done Tw,

I replaced my CTT's years ago using mostly the same method, but I didn't remove anything but the air box for the front one. That little coolant hose makes it a tight space, but I worked around it no problem. All that's needed is patients and some dexterity and it comes right out! :biggrin:

That first time was at 32k miles and with my bike showing 66k miles now I expect to start hearing some noise sometime soon. The rear never seems to go out like the front, maybe because it's on the downhill side of the rear head and always bathed in oil unlike the front CTT. :laugh: I replaced them both anyway.

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Yeah, Josh, great thread mate!! But I can't see Flat Stanley in the photos!! Hehehe.

It's good to read this thread, my 2003 VTECker has some 60,000 km on the clock and I'm only just starting to hear the odd CCT noise on letting off the throttle after giving it lots of gas... "blipping the throttle" so to speak. I know the sound oh too well from an old 1971 Toyota Hiace I had way back when... must've changed the CCT 3 times... in one year.

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Nicely done Tw,

I replaced my CTT's years ago using mostly the same method, but I didn't remove anything but the air box for the front one. That little coolant hose makes it a tight space, but I worked around it no problem. All that's needed is patients and some dexterity and it comes right out! :wheel:

That first time was at 32k miles and with my bike showing 66k miles now I expect to start hearing some noise sometime soon. The rear never seems to go out like the front, maybe because it's on the downhill side of the rear head and always bathed in oil unlike the front CTT. :huh: I replaced them both anyway.

Removing that hose (if equipped with a drain hose in hand) takes about 1 minute, and saves a ton of headaches...I would suggest removing them both, but natually there is more than one way to skin a cat (I prefer Duct Tape and Gasoline....)

I bought both, but the rear is quiet so I saved that one for future install...although next time I am going to try increasing the tension by 1-2 turns to see what it does. Now that I know the process is a 1 hour job at best, it isn't so daunting to put the old part back in.

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Yeah, Josh, great thread mate!! But I can't see Flat Stanley in the photos!! Hehehe.

It's good to read this thread, my 2003 VTECker has some 60,000 km on the clock and I'm only just starting to hear the odd CCT noise on letting off the throttle after giving it lots of gas... "blipping the throttle" so to speak. I know the sound oh too well from an old 1971 Toyota Hiace I had way back when... must've changed the CCT 3 times... in one year.

Flat Stanley was there in spirit. It would have been funny to include him in the job, maybe next time. Let me know if Honda Spain is insane on the CCT prices and if so I can ship you the second one I bought if you want a new one. Cost here wasn't too bad...$115 or so for both of them and all the parts needed.

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Thanks for a super post, tw. I just finished changing my oil, cleaning and re-oiling the K & N, flushing and filling the coolant, and swapping rubber on both tires for fresh skins last week while on vacation. I figure in the labor alone that probably saved about $5-600 over having it done by my local stealership. And, thanks to tutorials like this, I know it was done right. Not having access to Honda labor guides, I would hazard a wild guess that the flat rate procedure for replacing both of the CCT's is in the vicinity of 5.0 hours. At the local dealer's rate of $130.00/hr that's $650.00 saved in labor alone, a useful chunk of change to keep in your pocket. Er, you guys are going to make a mechanic out of me yet!

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I had both of my replaced last year under extended warranty while he was adjusting the valves and the guy said they didn't need to remove the throttle bodies either but since the manual calls for it and honda was footing the bill I think he should of. now will I need to have some "pair?" or starter? valves synced during a tune-up?

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Great write up. It seems so easy. Good job.

As a crafty technician it is in my best intrest and the customers to find easier ways to do things. It is not cheating a customer because a technician is bright. If technicians follow the book on every job we would make about $3 a year. Why disturb the throttle bodies if you dont have to?

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Great write up. It seems so easy. Good job.

As a crafty technician it is in my best intrest and the customers to find easier ways to do things. It is not cheating a customer because a technician is bright. If technicians follow the book on every job we would make about $3 a year. Why disturb the throttle bodies if you dont have to?

I agree, there is no sense removing a TB, and potentially disturbing another setting such a cable tension, Starter Valve, etc just because the "book" says to go that route. Now if they are not changing gaskets or replacing wearable parts that should be changed, and saying they are, that is a different story.

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tightwad, nice write-up. :fing02:

By any chance, has anyone ever measured the distance from the head of the shaft to the flat machined surface of the CCT body? I'm wondering if there is a difference between a new one and one that is bad.

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tightwad, nice write-up. :fing02:

By any chance, has anyone ever measured the distance from the head of the shaft to the flat machined surface of the CCT body? I'm wondering if there is a difference between a new one and one that is bad.

At what point, extended or compressed? The shaft extends quite far. I am betting the different part number has to do with a different manufacturing area or something. They appears identical to me.

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cct_falling_to_pieces.jpg

Ok, I am not a writer. I don't have the witty banter abilities of great technical writers who pull you into their project no matter the subject. Instead I am a typical desk jockey who rides VFR and fixes stuff if he can. Before I get into the "easy" way to change the CCT, let me point out that I did not come up with the process on my own. I borrowed bits and pieces from lots of people. The best replacement guide can be found here, CCT change by Rad, where it is done "by the book". In the resulting discussion it was revealed that removing the Throttle Bodies and so forth was a waste of time, as the CCT can be removed without it.

As a second note, I did not change the rear CCT, and I don't imagine I know or could discover any easier way...it seems simple enough already. See the link above to find how to change that CCT if needed.

As a third note (I like notes), I don't believe the CCTs EVER go bad...I think they make noise when the spring loses a bit of tension...more to come on that later (see how I "hook" you...just like the creative writing class said!)

So on to CCT removal and replacement (this order works best I have found)...Anyway, I didn't have music playing, I don't drink beer, and I barely remembered to take pictures....so bear with me. Finding the CCT was the first chore. It is located on the right side, kinda behind and back of the R/R. To find it you need to remove:

Right Fairing

  • 8 allen screws
  • 1 blind rivet
  • Slider (if applicable)

Seat

  • Just use the key, and remove

Tank

  • two 8mm head bolts, use 1/4" driver
  • Restraint Cable
  • Two 10mm head bolts at back of tank

Air Box Top

  • Hose from top
  • screws around perimeter

Air Box Bottom

  • Velocity Stacks, Phillips Head Bolts
  • Sensor connector on bottom
  • Vacuum line going in front of box
  • Small connections at the back

When moved, the airbox looks like this:

airbox_moved.jpg

Note the airbox was just rotated away from the CCT. Tank was also rotated the same way and laid across the seat rails. You can see the CCT at the very bottom, just right of center.

Now you are almost there....just need to remove those cooling hoses to make it stupidly easy to reach the CCT. Remove the one pointing out first, and connect a short section(2-3 feet) of 1/4" or similar hose (I didn't measure it, just some I had around, but 1/4" should be about right).

drain_tube_2.jpg

Route this into a drain pan or later you get this:

opps__piddled.jpg

next remove the second hose....this is what makes the first connection take a bit of a leak

second_hose_removed.jpg

not much fluid is lost...a bit more than is pictured here:

antifreeze_from_cct_change.jpg

Don't leave this for the dog/cats to drink, unless you don't like them much....

Now it's time to remove that CCT! Simply use your 8mm socket on extension, and take the center bolt out:

removing_the_cap.jpg

This is where the "key" goes in.

insert_lock.jpg

The keys job is to stop the CCT from extending when you remove it from the engine. Keeping it from extending makes it less likely that you knock a bit off into the motor, and also makes it easier for the CCT to clear the various bits above it. If you are really ambitious you could actually rotate the CCT to shorten it and make it even easier...but that would be over kill. After loosing both mounting bolts, and removing them, the CCT just slides right out:

cct_coming_out.jpg

Here is where I have to admit I have a problem. I enjoy seeing how things work. I managed to restrain myself from taking apart my new CCT to see how it works, but the old one was just there....so I had to do it. Initially I planned to try the Reddog idea of tightening the spring....but I screwed up my spring after I removed it, so that was nixxed. Here is a nice picture of my CCT doing it's best Humpty Dumpty impression:

cct_falling_to_pieces.jpg

you can see where the spring is messed up....yours won't look like that (don't take it apart to see tho). Let me describe the parts, so hopefully this makes more sense to those who want to know. Those who don't want to know can skip to anther thread or something...

Clockwise starting from the left you have:

  • CCT Gasket
  • CCT body, with circlip just slid back
  • key
  • Sping(in the middle)
  • bushing/sleeve
  • Worm Drive
  • Shaft with puck on end

The sleeve/bushing goes around the worm drive, and over the shaft below the locking tab. The locking tab doesn't come off the shaft (without removing far too much).

The way the CCT works is this:

The spring is coiled around the shaft, with one end going into the slot at the bottom of the worm drive, and the other end into a slit at the top of the CCT body. As the worm drive is rotated clockwise, the spring winds up....and if allowed the worm drive will rotate counter clockwise to release tension. The worm drive can only rotate 4 times before the Shaft reaches its stopper. I believe the reason you begin to hear CCT noise is that the spring is able to unwind with a bit of Cam Chain stretch, and thus the spring is not as tight as it was originally. This loosness allows a bit more play that normal, and oscillations begin. Whether different oils help or not I don't even want to discuss.

If you wish to attempt to modify your CCT to save some cash, here is how you do it:

Holding the CCT in such a way that your finger restrains the shaft from advancing, remove the "key". Using a small (probably modified for the purpose) screwdriver, rotate the wormdrive from the access hole clockwise until it stops. Counts the revolutions. It will stop with the shaft all the way compressed. Now reinsert the key, and while still holding the shaft, slide the circlip down so it no longer restrains the locking tab. slide the locking tab carefully up the shaft out of the grooves, noting 2 grooves are wider than the other 2. Then very carefully rotate the shaft counter-clockwise 1-2 times as many revolutions as it took to compress it initially. (this figure is a guess, your results may very, I make no guarantees..written, expressed or otherwise, not available in all locations, subject to rule changes etc). After rotating the shaft counter-clockwise, slide the locking tab back down, and replace the circlip. Re-insert the screwdriver and rotate the gear clockwise to compress the shaft once more. Now you can reinstall the CCT and see if you saved $100.

Reinstalling the CCT is the reverse of removal (I hate it when manuals state that, but it's true. Just check and make sure all connections are replaced or you may not like the results...I didn't.

look_close.jpg

That is the connector I forgot. The FI light was blinking when I started the bike. I was able to get it back on without removing the air box again using a long thing screwdriver. Speaking of which, here are all the tools I needed to do the job:

every_tool_needed.jpg

1/4" driver handle

1/4" Rachet

1/4" x3" extension

1/4" x 6" extension

1/4"x1/4" socket for hose clamp

1/4"x8mm socket for CCT bolts and tank bolts

Phillips Screw Driver

3/8" Rachet

3/8"x10mm socket

3/8" x 6" extension

Needed this time, but not always required:

Long Needle Nose pliars

Extra Long thin screwdriver

Telescoping Magnetic pickup tool

Some pictures were not included, you can see them all here:

http://www.wiremybike.com/Slideshows/CCT%20Change/

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just bumping this because Didit needed it in another thread....

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Nicely done Tw,

I replaced my CTT's years ago using mostly the same method, but I didn't remove anything but the air box for the front one. That little coolant hose makes it a tight space, but I worked around it no problem. All that's needed is patients and some dexterity and it comes right out! :blush:

That first time was at 32k miles and with my bike showing 66k miles now I expect to start hearing some noise sometime soon. The rear never seems to go out like the front, maybe because it's on the downhill side of the rear head and always bathed in oil unlike the front CTT. :huh: I replaced them both anyway.

Removing that hose (if equipped with a drain hose in hand) takes about 1 minute, and saves a ton of headaches...I would suggest removing them both, but natually there is more than one way to skin a cat (I prefer Duct Tape and Gasoline....)

I bought both, but the rear is quiet so I saved that one for future install...although next time I am going to try increasing the tension by 1-2 turns to see what it does. Now that I know the process is a 1 hour job at best, it isn't so daunting to put the old part back in.

Good post, TW.

Just to add a little tidbit from personal experience.

If you do nothing else right, these three things MUST be done.

1 - Don't be a lazy bestid and remove that hose.

2 - The CCT CAN be removed w/o the little key. BUT Don't be a lazy bestid and use the key

3 - You could tighten the two CCT bolts by hand, BUT Don't be a lazy bestid and use the torque wrench.

Following these simple instructions will prevent a lot of gray hairs and you wouldn't have to post topics titled "Oooopppsss!!!"

Ask me how I know :blush: :dry: :rolleyes: :ph34r:

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Nicely done Tw,

I replaced my CTT's years ago using mostly the same method, but I didn't remove anything but the air box for the front one. That little coolant hose makes it a tight space, but I worked around it no problem. All that's needed is patients and some dexterity and it comes right out! :blush:

That first time was at 32k miles and with my bike showing 66k miles now I expect to start hearing some noise sometime soon. The rear never seems to go out like the front, maybe because it's on the downhill side of the rear head and always bathed in oil unlike the front CTT. :huh: I replaced them both anyway.

Removing that hose (if equipped with a drain hose in hand) takes about 1 minute, and saves a ton of headaches...I would suggest removing them both, but natually there is more than one way to skin a cat (I prefer Duct Tape and Gasoline....)

I bought both, but the rear is quiet so I saved that one for future install...although next time I am going to try increasing the tension by 1-2 turns to see what it does. Now that I know the process is a 1 hour job at best, it isn't so daunting to put the old part back in.

Good post, TW.

Just to add a little tidbit from personal experience.

If you do nothing else right, these three things MUST be done.

1 - Don't be a lazy bestid and remove that hose.

2 - The CCT CAN be removed w/o the little key. BUT Don't be a lazy bestid and use the key

3 - You could tighten the two CCT bolts by hand, BUT Don't be a lazy bestid and use the torque wrench.

Following these simple instructions will prevent a lot of gray hairs and you wouldn't have to post topics titled "Oooopppsss!!!"

Ask me how I know :blush: :dry: :rolleyes: :ph34r:

I recall having read your thread prior to doing mine...which is why I was so careful about what was in the way. The worst part of the whole thing was when that hose started draining on me, and I was scrambling to find something for it to drain into while elbow deep in the bike.

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I did mine just before the Summer Summit, the hardest part for me was getting that little flat black metal cover plate out on the rear bank, you have to wiggle it just right.

I paid about $55 each for the CMTs and I didn't have to remove the throttle bodies and only removed one hose on the front one. Take time to secure your tank on your seat so it doesn't fall off. Use the keys to take up the length of the new ones and old ones as this makes removal and installation much easier. I used pair of needle nosed vice grips to twist the key but they are light metal and bend easy. Really it was way easier than I thought.

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The good: Just did my front CCT in about two hours including bs'ing with a friend during that period. Tank, air-box, disconnect wire harness, pull upper hose that has the squeeze clamp, and bend the other hose out of the way. Old one came right out and new one went right back in. The hardest part was getting the air-box hooked back up.

The bad: The constant noise is mostly gone but I can still hear an intermittent rattle/tick/noise so either my back one is bad too or something else is amiss.

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The bad: The constant noise is mostly gone but I can still hear an intermittent rattle/tick/noise so either my back one is bad too or something else is amiss.

Its hit or miss to get a tentioner that doesnt rattle , just look at those who've replaced them multiple times even at best they dont rattle for a while , being you did get change on the issue , says you replaced the right part.

You probably seen my mention on the issue with oil type that corrected my noise and it was loud& Kronic , but I recently noticed The oil hole through the gasket can barely fit a needle through, I wonder if increasing that hole would free the oil flow alittle and aide with the body rattle, so people can use what ever oil they want and be noise free.

Edited by spud786

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