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DirtyRyda

Factors that Increase and Decrease Motorcycle Crash Risk.

Thanks for that link. WhiIe I did not get through the whole article there was a lot to think about and put into practice. I found myself in several of those statistics, especially the slow and no speed parking lot "capsizes". Short legs do not help. :ph34r:

 

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Aggressive riding, excessive speed. That pretty much says it.

Except I don't think I would call a "low speed ground impact" a crash.

Tipover yes. Capsize, that's for boats, or maybe a hog.

Agreed, short legs do not help. :sleep:

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36 minutes ago, VFR4Lee said:

Except I don't think I would call a "low speed ground impact" a crash.

 

I would (as long as the bike is moving, I guess.)

 

Parking lot, 5-10MPH. Broken ankle and down 10 weeks.

 

That's a crash to me.

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Ouch. That's a crash. I was thinking little or no speed in driveway or even garage,

oops it's heavy when you allow it to lean over. :wacko:

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Whoa... no Sport Riders over the age of 50...

 

I think of  my riding as assertive not aggressive...

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Kind of interesting, but it's a shame they didn't separate speeding from agressive riding, such as passing on the right. Speeding gets a bad rap a lot of times, for no good reason.

And I wonder if they consider speeding as starting at 1 mile over the posted speed limit.

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19 hours ago, BusyLittleShop said:

Whoa... no Sport Riders over the age of 50...

 

I think of  my riding as assertive not aggressive...

 

Most of the sport riders I know are in the over 50 group.

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3 minutes ago, MBrane said:

 

Most of the sport riders I know are in the over 50 group.

 

Guessing this would not change if you removed the word sport. :happy:

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10 minutes ago, VFR4Lee said:

 

Guessing this would not change if you removed the word sport. :happy:

 

True that. Seems younger folk are not into motorsports as much as us old codgers.

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1 hour ago, MBrane said:

 

True that. Seems younger folk are not into motorsports as much as us old codgers.

 

But but, you did not remove the word sport. :tongue:

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Sorry forgot it's only a sport if it involves chasing a ball. 

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5 hours ago, MBrane said:

Sorry forgot it's only a sport if it involves chasing a ball. 

First of all, I have a shirt that says "Most sports only take one ball." !

 

On 4/22/2017 at 0:43 PM, thtanner said:

 

I would (as long as the bike is moving, I guess.)

 

Parking lot, 5-10MPH. Broken ankle and down 10 weeks.

 

That's a crash to me.

I'll call you and raise you a zero-speed broken foot.

 

While heading to T-Mac, it started to rain, so I pulled over to put the rain cover on the tank bag. As I put the sidestand down while getting off the machine, my boot slipped off the sidestand, which did not get to the ground. The next thing I knew I came-to when my helmet hit the ground. With highway-help I picked up the bike and proceeded on my way. A little later my left foot started to hurt. By the time I got to Waterloo, IA, 200 miles hence, I could not walk from the gas pump to the store. "This is not good." crossed my mind. Familiar with Waterloo, I rode to the hospital five miles further on. A broken fifth metatarsal bone was declared.

 

After returning home (a long but lucky story) I saw a footbone doc who said it was a typical injury to someone who lands on the side of their foot. He figured that when I loaded up my left foot/ankle trying to keep the machine upright, I passed out from the pain, only coming-to when I hit the ground.

 

Lesson Learned: I figure out there was sooo much chain goop on the sidestand spring that it did not snap down the last few inches - much slower deployment than I expected - and that, combined with a slippery boot bottom, ultimately broke my foot. (Well.. there may have been some operator error. Now I always determine that my sidestand is Down before I dismount.)

 

(I'm going to post up a separate thread on this incident as a heads-up warning.)

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Most sportbike riders over 50 want nothing to do with some survey or study. Just want to ride with their crusty old friends. Nothing to learn from that study we haven't experienced first hand IMHO.

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Wow......naturalistic study, natural riding, recruiting, demographics, data dictionary development, data mining methodology, baselines, risk factor analysis, and so much more to come to conclusion in part, "All of the crashes and near crashes included in the risk analyses involve some type of control loss for the rider, whereas the baseline reference events include no loss of control"......really!  You don't have to be over 50, or to have even ridden a motorcycle before, to know when there is a crash, the operator lost control.  We can always argue as to the cause of that loss of control, but the bottom line if we don't lose control there is no crash (with the one exception when an operator is not at the controls!).

And, in the conclusion is a nice marketing plug for the MSF Basic Rider's Course.  Please don't misunderstand, I support rider training, as for most of my adult life I have been in one fashion or the other an instructor/teacher.  Understanding the MSF called for this study report, it still would have been better, in my opinion, to reference motorcycle training in general with perhaps a side bar to the MSF training.

Always wanting to learn (student before instructor) these studies interest me, but at age 71 (I think that squarely qualifies me to be a member of the over 50 club), I also need to balance 'study time' with 'doing time' and this study was pretty much a waste of my time.  I'm sure there was gratification for those conducting the study and that is fine.  And, now that I have wasted even more time writing this reply, time to stand up, crank up the bike, and ride!   Or, maybe I'll have lunch first.....

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5 hours ago, EagleSix said:

but at age 71 (I think that squarely qualifies me to be a member of the over 50 club), I also need to balance 'study time' with 'doing time' and this study was pretty much a waste of my time.  I'm sure there was gratification for those conducting the study and that is fine.  And, now that I have wasted even more time writing this reply, time to stand up, crank up the bike, and ride!   Or, maybe I'll have lunch first.....

 

You probably don't want to leave on an empty stomach, then again maybe there's a good lunch place along the way. :wink:

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14 hours ago, VFR4Lee said:

 

You probably don't want to leave on an empty stomach, then again maybe there's a good lunch place along the way. :wink:

 

Lunch was good, the ride was good, now it's time to ride again!

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