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Just Installed a Compufire Series Regulator


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#1 DaveB

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 06:48 PM

I just installed a Compu-fire 55402 series regulator; I bought it from Chrome-Addiction.com for $173.

The unit is a little smaller than the standard Honda R&R but the mounting holes line up nicely so installation was easy. I just cut off the stator connector and lengthen the wires then connected them to the new regulator using a connector block. The unit came with 2 long and very beefy power output wires which I connected directly to the battery via the 40 amp fuse that it came with. This avoids using the old cables and connectors that everyone here on this site seems to replace with a VFRness.

The regulator gave 14.25 volts at the battery and was supplying 15 amps to run the bike and charge the battery i.e. much less that the 40 amps that is continuously supplied by original shunt unit most of which is dumped to ground.

The major benefit of the series regulator is that the power supplied is typically half that of the standard unit as it doesnít regulate by dumping excess power to ground. So I donít expect to burn up regulators and stators on regular basis as many people here seem to. The regulator is rated at 40 amps which gives it has plenty of reserve power for more accessories.

gallery_491_6304_11207.jpggallery_491_6304_1801.pnggallery_491_3_114.png


#2 rangemaster

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 07:09 PM

Thanks for posting up on your install.
There will be a lot of interest in your long term experience with it. My GSXR 750 R/R on my '97 has been working great for almost 3 years now, but if it dies I'll probably go with the Compufire.

Edited by rangemaster, 22 April 2011 - 07:09 PM.


#3 spud786

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Posted 22 April 2011 - 08:40 PM

Just curious, with headlights on low, and metering the battery, how does the voltage change as you raise thottle to around 5000 rpm? Then try on high

You can see the shuting of voltage with stock set up, atleast till the high beams generate a big load,

Edited by spud786, 22 April 2011 - 08:41 PM.


#4 DaveB

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 09:35 AM

Just curious, with headlights on low, and metering the battery, how does the voltage change as you raise thottle to around 5000 rpm? Then try on high

You can see the shuting of voltage with stock set up, at least till the high beams generate a big load,



Increasing the RPM from 1200 to 5000 rpm caused the battery voltage to drop from 14.25 to 14.15 it made no difference whether the high beams were on. At idle putting on the high beams again dropped the voltage to 14.15. So it seems to regulate to 14.15 to 14.25 volts.

gallery_491_6304_11207.jpggallery_491_6304_1801.pnggallery_491_3_114.png


#5 mello dude

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 10:33 AM

I just installed a Compu-fire 55402 series regulator; I bought it from Chrome-Addiction.com for $173.

The unit is a little smaller than the standard Honda R&R but the mounting holes line up nicely so installation was easy. I just cut off the stator connector and lengthen the wires then connected them to the new regulator using a connector block. The unit came with 2 long and very beefy power output wires which I connected directly to the battery via the 40 amp fuse that it came with. This avoids using the old cables and connectors that everyone here on this site seems to replace with a VFRness.

The regulator gave 14.25 volts at the battery and was supplying 15 amps to run the bike and charge the battery i.e. much less that the 40 amps that is continuously supplied by original shunt unit most of which is dumped to ground.

The major benefit of the series regulator is that the power supplied is typically half that of the standard unit as it doesn’t regulate by dumping excess power to ground. So I don’t expect to burn up regulators and stators on regular basis as many people here seem to. The regulator is rated at 40 amps which gives it has plenty of reserve power for more accessories.


Could you post some pics of the install? This is on my to do list for my '98 electrical cleanup.
-- Let us how know this works out - you may be the first CF R/R on a VFR.

#6 DaveB

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 11:10 AM


I just installed a Compu-fire 55402 series regulator; I bought it from Chrome-Addiction.com for $173.

The unit is a little smaller than the standard Honda R&R but the mounting holes line up nicely so installation was easy. I just cut off the stator connector and lengthen the wires then connected them to the new regulator using a connector block. The unit came with 2 long and very beefy power output wires which I connected directly to the battery via the 40 amp fuse that it came with. This avoids using the old cables and connectors that everyone here on this site seems to replace with a VFRness.

The regulator gave 14.25 volts at the battery and was supplying 15 amps to run the bike and charge the battery i.e. much less that the 40 amps that is continuously supplied by original shunt unit most of which is dumped to ground.

The major benefit of the series regulator is that the power supplied is typically half that of the standard unit as it doesnít regulate by dumping excess power to ground. So I donít expect to burn up regulators and stators on regular basis as many people here seem to. The regulator is rated at 40 amps which gives it has plenty of reserve power for more accessories.


Could you post some pics of the install? This is on my to do list for my '98 electrical cleanup.
-- Let us how know this works out - you may be the first CF R/R on a VFR.


Here are a few pics sorry i didn't photograph
the unit off the bike

DSCN2787.JPG

DSCN2783.JPG


The old Honda unit

DSCN2786.JPG


Lengthen stator wires

DSCN2784.JPG


Battery connection with fuse

DSCN2785.JPG

gallery_491_6304_11207.jpggallery_491_6304_1801.pnggallery_491_3_114.png


#7 pserve

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 07:11 PM

Increasing the RPM from 1200 to 5000 rpm caused the battery voltage to drop from 14.25 to 14.15 it made no difference whether the high beams were on. At idle putting on the high beams again dropped the voltage to 14.15. So it seems to regulate to 14.15 to 14.25 volts.

This sounds like 14V+ at 1200 rpm idle with high beams on, which seems unlikely to me. Can you double-check that?

My test with factory components:
(FYI - You may need to cut the volume down...)

http://www.vfrdiscus...age/53324-vfr11

Edited by pserve, 23 April 2011 - 07:14 PM.


#8 johnmark101

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 09:25 PM

I just received a new MOSFET regulator / rectifier from "wiremybike.com". Hope to get around to the install in the next day or two. My factory unit is still working fine at 40,000 miles, but I am hitting the road for a few days in May and thought it would be a good time to do the upgrade in order to avoid getting stranded.
Power is nothing without control.

#9 spud786

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 10:16 PM


Just curious, with headlights on low, and metering the battery, how does the voltage change as you raise thottle to around 5000 rpm? Then try on high

You can see the shuting of voltage with stock set up, at least till the high beams generate a big load,



Increasing the RPM from 1200 to 5000 rpm caused the battery voltage to drop from 14.25 to 14.15 it made no difference whether the high beams were on. At idle putting on the high beams again dropped the voltage to 14.15. So it seems to regulate to 14.15 to 14.25 volts.



Interesting Notes and results. If these really are the answer to increased stator life, that would be nice. The Voltage seem to be running lower than a stock 6th gen, so I would expect higher current levels, under load.

But it comes down to Stator life, If people consistantly getiing more than 60,000 mile on stators, that would be a really good sign,

#10 DaveB

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 10:47 PM


Increasing the RPM from 1200 to 5000 rpm caused the battery voltage to drop from 14.25 to 14.15 it made no difference whether the high beams were on. At idle putting on the high beams again dropped the voltage to 14.15. So it seems to regulate to 14.15 to 14.25 volts.

This sounds like 14V+ at 1200 rpm idle with high beams on, which seems unlikely to me. Can you double-check that?

My test with factory components:
(FYI - You may need to cut the volume down...)

http://www.vfrdiscus...age/53324-vfr11


According to its specs this R&R is set to regulate to 14.25 volts which may be a little less than the stock Honda unit. On their web site Compu-fire claim their 3 phase charging system will give 25 amps at idle and 40 amps above 2800 rpm this is with their stator and is of course designed for use on a Harley.

I got 14.15 volts at 1200 rpm idle with the high beams on. So it works for me !

I have just done 120 miles with no issues I'll let you know how I get on in a few 1000 miles more.

gallery_491_6304_11207.jpggallery_491_6304_1801.pnggallery_491_3_114.png





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