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Homemade Manometer


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#1 Darth Bling

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 03:43 PM

Posted Image


I got this idea from imortlfool in the Valve Synch Thread. But, since there weren't any pictures, I decided to post my own.

Basically, a manometer measures pressure (Mano- is the Greek term for "gas" or "vapor"). Many expensive manometers (like the Motion Pro or Carbtune) allow you to measure the vacuum of each cylinder in cmHg (centimeter of mercury). Since the starter valves on the VFR VTEC are supposed to be set equal to each other, then there's no need to measure the vacuum of each cylinder. All we need to know is what the vacuum in the cylinders are, relative to the other cylinders. Or, to be more specifically, what the vacuum of each cylinder is compared to cylinder #4. This is what the homemade manometer was designed to do.


Each of the four plastic tubes are connect to the vacuum lines from each cylinder. Each cylinder will exert a force on the oil in each tube. Essentially, the cylinders are playing a game of tug-o-war. Whichever cylinder is creating the most pressure will "win" and pull the oil in it's tube higher than the other cylinders. Our goal is to balance the starter valves so each cylinder is exerting the same amount of force, and therefore getting the oil level in each tube to be the same.

I used 1/4" inner diameter, 3/8" outer diameter plastic tubing to build my manometer. Each tube is 7 feet long. The reason I made the tubes so long was if there was a leak anywhere in the manometer or with any connections, oil can get sucked up into your cylinders (not good). With long tubes, you should have ample to recognized the problem, panic, and then hit the kill switch.

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Manometer.JPG

You'll also need two T-connectors and a small section of tube. This allows you to hook up all four tubes together. The best way to fill the manometer is from the bottom. With two of the tubes disconnected from the T-connectors, fill the tubes with oil (or another liquid of your choice, i.e. water). Connect to tubes to the T-connectors and turn the manometer upright. Gravity takes over and balances the oil levels in each tube.

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ManometerConnector.JPG

If I remember correctly, the vacuum tubes on the VFR are 5/32" (3.5mm). So, I used some 1/4" to 5/32" adapters to connect the tubes togethers. Also, it might also be a good idea to got four 5/32" to 5/32" adaptors and some extra tubing (5/32" size). Disconnecting the vacuum tubes from the 5-way connector from in between the throttle bodies is not fun. So, to prepare for the day that I have to synch the starter valves again, I used the straight 5/32" adaptors and extra tubing to make the the vacuums lines on the bike longer. This will make it much easier in the future to hook up the manometer since the you can now pull the 5-way connector out from underneath the throttle bodies and disconnect it in the open.

Hope you you guys find this post helpful. Good luck synching those valves.
Tim

Edited by Darth Bling, 17 March 2008 - 01:12 PM.

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#2 imortlfool

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 04:12 PM

Awesome. Looks good.

#3 fallzboater

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 04:17 PM

Since the starter valves on the VFR VTEC are supposed to be set equal to each other, then there's no need to measure the vacuum of each cylinder.  All we need to know is what the vacuum in the cylinders are, relative to the other cylinders.  Or, to be more specifically, what the vacuum of each cylinder is compared to cylinder #4. 


Clever setup! I've also read about the 20mmHg difference method, which has been recommended by some, and is apparantly the Honda-approved method for the earlier bikes. The idea being to smooth the transition as the throttles are just cracked open. Has there been a consensus, here? Anyone tried both methods?

See the first two stickies (VTEC fuelling) here:
http://www.bikersora...display.php?f=4

If you use water in your manometer, 20mmHg = 10.7inH2O.

#4 Darth Bling

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 04:31 PM

Clever setup!? I've also read about the 20mmHg difference method, which has been recommended by some, and is apparantly the Honda-approved method for the earlier bikes.? The idea being to smooth the transition as the throttles are just cracked open.? Has there been a consensus, here?? Anyone tried both methods?

See the first two stickies (VTEC fuelling) here:
http://www.bikersora...display.php?f=4

If you use water in your manometer, 20mmHg = 10.7inH2O.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

From what I remember reading on that forum, everyone thought it was a translation problem with the English service manual. But after getting someone in Japan to translate a Japanese VFR service manual for them, they found the manual was right and all the values should be set equal to the fourth cylinder. In any case, balancing the starter values with either of the two methods would probably be a vast improvement since most dealerships didn't synch them at all.

The first manometer I made was a disaster. I found water to too light (almost sucked water into my engine :o ). Motor oil seems to work very well.

Edited by MFP-2241, 26 October 2005 - 04:40 PM.

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#5 fallzboater

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 04:59 PM

From what I remember reading on that forum, everyone thought it was a translation problem with the English service manual.  But after getting someone in Japan to translate a Japanese VFR service manual for them, they found the manual was right and all the values should be set equal to the fourth cylinder.  In any case, balancing the starter values with either of the two methods would probably be a vast improvement since most dealerships didn't synch them at all.

The first manometer I made was a disaster.  I found water to too light (almost sucked water into my engine :o ).  Motor oil seems to work very well.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I went and skimmed back through that thread, and it sounds like our interpretations agree. I bought my '02 two weeks ago with 9,700 miles, and it's probably never been synched. Getting them all as even as possible sounds like the way to go. After mine's synched, our bikes should be pretty equivalent and we could probably make a good comparison with the TCFPR mod (even swap it to your bike if you wanted to try it).

Motor oil is actually lighter than water, but more viscous (I'm sure you knew that).

#6 Darth Bling

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 05:06 PM

Motor oil is actually lighter than water, but more viscous (I'm sure you knew that).

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yeah, that's what I meant. I was going to use the word "fluid", but settled on "light" for some reason.^_^
RC51 Front End Swap, Leo Vince Ti Exhaust, 98/99 Catless Headers, Elka Rear Shock, Magura 195 Radial Master Cylinders for Clutch and Brake, Darth Bling's GSXR Mirrors, Busy Little Shop's Lowering Peg Blocks, Radar's Frame Sliders, J&M Handlebar CB Radio, ATV Handlebars, Zero Gravity Touring Windscreen, Honda Panniers and Top Box, Rostra Electric Cruise Control, Euro-spec Right Control Switch, GSXR Left Control Switch, Sargent Seat

#7 Beck

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 05:07 PM

Haven't used my carbtune balancer for a long time, but I think I remember that there could be small plastic inline restrictors in the tubes, in addtion to the manifold adapters to limit the amount of vacuum in the system and maybe prevent the (in my case) mercury from getting sucked through into the cylinders.
Maybe you should add those to further avoid the suck=hydrolock china syndrome with your engine.

Beck
95 VFR

Edited by Beck, 26 October 2005 - 05:08 PM.


#8 Darth Bling

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 05:20 PM

Haven't used my carbtune balancer for a long time, but I think I remember that there could be small plastic inline restrictors in the tubes, in addtion to the manifold adapters to limit the amount of vacuum in the system and maybe prevent the (in my case) mercury from getting sucked through into the cylinders.
Maybe you should add those to further avoid the suck=hydrolock china syndrome with your engine.

Beck
95 VFR

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Definitely a good idea! But, I found with motor oil and 7 foot long tubes, I have still have a very comfortable safety margin. The highest the oil ever made it up in any of the tubes in my manometer was about 2 feet, but I was screwing around with starter valves screws. I was thinking about adding some valves to each tube. That way I could balance the cylinders one at a time.

(The first manometer I made had some serious design flaws. Actually, I should be taken out a back and beaten with a garden hose for thinking it would work.)

Edited by MFP-2241, 30 October 2006 - 04:41 PM.

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#9 NVR2L8

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 05:22 PM

I have the Motion Pro carb tool, but I'm wondering if the inline restrictors are even necessary. I agree they're recommended to keep the fluid from entering the engine (mercury in my case too), but are they needed if you don't rev the engine past 3000 or so? Would the engine pull more vacuum on the tool if the restrictors are removed?

MFP-2241: Where did you find the 1/4" to 5/32" adaptors?

#10 fallzboater

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 05:41 PM

I have the Motion Pro carb tool, but I'm wondering if the inline restrictors are even necessary.  I agree they're recommended to keep the fluid from entering the engine (mercury in my case too), but are they needed if you don't rev the engine past 3000 or so?  Would the engine pull more vacuum on the tool if the restrictors are removed?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


The highest vacuum is with the throttles closed, so I wouldn't worry about revving the engine. If it works at normal idle, it'll work at higher revs as well. I'm not going to be the one to tell you to pull the restrictors, though! There's no velocity through the restrictors, so there shouldn't be a drop in pressure (vacuum) through them either. I don't think it would make any difference in the function of the tool.

Actually, you will get higher than idle intake vacuum using engine braking (throttles closed, higher revs), but obviously we're doing this in neutral and the bike isn't rolling.




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